Reasons for Corbyn

The coincidence of the Corbyn surge with the horror of Grenfell Tower has created the conditions – and the demand – for a kind of truth and reconciliation commission on forty years of neoliberalism. It is too simple to cast Corbyn as a throwback, but it is undeniable that his appeal and his authority derive partly from his willingness to cast a different, less forgiving light on recent history, so that we don’t have to carry on repeating it.

Published in London Review of Books, July 2017

Essay: Populism & the Limits of Neoliberalism

The surge in so-called ‘populism’ over the past year, largely of a right-wing variety, has provoked an ongoing debate as to how we should characterise its central driver. To put this somewhat crudely (though not much more crudely than some of the debate’s protagonists), the choice comes down to a simple binary: economics or culture? Class or identity? An awkward new category of ‘the left behind’ has emerged in political discourse to capture the unexpected supporters of Donald Trump, Brexit, Marine Le Pen and other nationalist movements. Continue reading “Essay: Populism & the Limits of Neoliberalism”

Populism, Markets and Expertise -4th May, University of Warwick

This conference aims to address issues of social-scientific expertise and claims for authority in the light of recent political events and the rise of populism in Europe, the US, and elsewhere. These expressions represent different kinds of voice with implications for public debate and democratic practice and we believe that as social scientists and academics we have to bring our voices to bear more insistently within these debates.

More details here.

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